Climate change in the polar regions / John Turner and Gareth J. Marshall.

Comprehensive, up-to-date account of polar climate change over the last one million years for researchers and advanced students in polar science.

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Turner, J. (John)
Other Authors: Marshall, Gareth J.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click for online access
Table of Contents:
  • Cover; CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE POLAR REGIONS; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; 1: Introduction; 1.1 The environment of the polar regions; 1.1.1 The Arctic; 1.1.2 The Antarctic; 1.2 The role of the polar regions in the global climate system; 1.3 Possible implications of high latitude climate change; 1.3.1 Introduction; 1.3.2 The Arctic; 1.3.3 The Antarctic; 2: Polar climate data and models; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Instrumental observations; 2.2.1 Introduction; 2.2.2 Surface data; 2.2.3 Upper air climate data; 2.2.4 Ocean data; 2.3 Meteorological analysis fields; 2.3.1 Introduction.
  • 2.3.2 Numerical weather prediction models2.3.3 Reanalyses; 2.4 Remotely sensed data; 2.4.1 Introduction; 2.4.2 Satellite imagery; 2.4.3 Satellite sounding data; 2.5 Proxy climate data; 2.5.1 Introduction; 2.5.2 Ice cores; 2.5.3 Sediment cores; 2.5.4 Dendrochronology; 2.5.5 Dating of driftwood; 2.5.6 Historical records; 2.6 Models; 2.6.1 Introduction; 2.6.2 Climate models; 2.6.3 Ice sheet models; 3: The high latitude climates and mechanisms of change; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Factors influencing the broadscale climates of the polar regions; 3.2.1 Introduction; 3.2.2 The radiation regime.
  • 3.2.3 The poleward heat flux3.2.4 The atmospheric heat budgets of the polar regions; 3.2.5 The water vapour budget; 3.3 Processes of the high latitude climates; 3.3.1 High latitude feedbacks and amplification; 3.3.2 Air-sea-ice interactions; 3.4 The mechanisms of high latitude climate change; 3.4.1 Orbital and solar changes; 3.4.2 Heinrich events; 3.4.3 Dansgaard-Oeschger events; 3.4.4 Atmospheric gases and aerosols; 3.4.5 The effects of extra-polar climate variability; 3.4.6 ENSO and the Pacific teleconnections; 3.4.7 The Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) and Antarctic dipole (ADP).
  • 3.5 Atmospheric circulation3.5.1 Arctic; 3.5.2 The Antarctic; 3.6 Temperature; 3.6.1 Arctic; 3.6.2 Antarctic; 3.7 Cloud and precipitation; 3.7.1 Cloud; 3.7.2 Precipitation; 3.8 Sea ice; 3.8.1 The nature of sea ice; 3.8.2 Sea ice motion; 3.8.3 Climatological occurrence; 3.9 The ocean circulation; 3.9.1 The Arctic; 3.9.2 Antarctic; 3.10 Concluding remarks; 4: The last million years; 4.1 Introduction; 4.1.1 On the notation used; 4.1.2 The frequency of ice ages; 4.2 The Arctic; 4.2.1 The period before Termination II (~130 kyr BP); 4.2.2 The last interglacial (130-115 kyr BP).
  • 4.2.3 Later MIS 5: 107-75 kyr BP4.2.4 MIS4 and MIS 3: 75-25 kyr BP; 4.2.5 The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and MIS 1: 24-11.5 kyr BP; 4.3 The Antarctic; 4.3.1 The period before Termination V (1000-430 kyr BP); 4.3.2 Termination V (~430 kyr BP); 4.3.3 Terminations IV to II (~320 to ~138 kyr BP); 4.3.4 MIS 3 and 4 and Termination I; 4.4 Linking high latitude climate change in the two hemispheres; 5: The Holocene; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Forcing of the climate system during the Holocene; 5.2.1 Introduction; 5.2.2 Orbital changes; 5.2.3 Solar output; 5.2.4 Volcanic aerosols.