Bible Translation : Frames of Reference.

This book offers a broad-based, contemporary perspective on Bible translation in terms of academic areas foundational to the endeavor: translation studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, biblical studies and literary and rhetorical studies. The discussion of each area is geared...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Wilt, Timothy
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click for online access

MARC

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245 1 0 |a Bible Translation :  |b Frames of Reference. 
260 |a Hoboken :  |b Taylor and Francis,  |c 2014. 
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588 0 |a Print version record. 
505 0 |a Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction; 1. Scripture Translation in the Era of Translation Studies; 1.1 The dynamic equivalent approach to translation and its institutionalization; 1.2 Evaluation of the TAPOT approach to translation; 1.3 The emergence of translation studies as an autonomous discipline; 1.4 Some contemporary translation approaches; 1.4.1 Functionalist; 1.4.2 Descriptive; 1.4.3 Text-linguistic; 1.4.4 Relevance theory; 1.4.5 Post-colonial; 1.4.6 Literalist; 1.4.7 Foreignization v. domestication; 1.5 Conclusion; 2. Translation and Communication. 
505 8 |a 2.1 Components of communication2.1.1 Participants, text and medium; 2.1.2 Text; 2.1.2.1 Texts composed of signs; 2.1.2.2 Selection and perception of a text's signs; 2.1.2.3 Social metaphors for the translated text; 2.1.3 The medium; 2.2 Frames; 2.2.1 Cognitive frames; 2.2.2 Sociocultural frames; 2.2.3 Organizational frames; 2.2.3.1 Multiple organizational frames; 2.2.3.2 Frames of a particular organization; 2.2.4 Communication-situation frame; 2.2.4.1 Some basic elements of any communication situation; 2.2.4.2 Dramatic changes in the communication situations of Bible translation. 
505 8 |a 2.2.5 Text frames2.3 Goals; 2.3.1 Some fundamental goals; 2.3.1.1 Text goals; 2.3.1.2 Organizational goals; 2.3.2 Conflicting goals; 2.3.3 Ritual communication; 2.4 Exchange: focus on the Bible translation process; 2.4.1 Assessing the communication situation; 2.4.2 Facilitating cooperation; 2.4.3 Goals and resources; 2.4.4 Academic and technical training; 2.4.5 Producing the text; 2.4.6 Evaluation; 2.4.7 Further product development; 2.5 Graphic representation of the communication model; 2.5.1 Easy communication; 2.5.2 Differences from earlier models of communication. 
505 8 |a 2.5.3 Difficult communication2.6 Conclusion; 3. The role of Culture in Translation; 3.1 Katan's Translating Cultures; 3.2 Women, Fire and Dangerous Things; 3.3 Night, sun and wine; 3.4 'Key'; 3.5 A map of some fundamental biblical notions; 3.5.1 Reciprocity; 3.5.1.1 Tsedeq/tsedeqah; 3.5.1.2 'emet/'emunah/he'emin; 3.5.1.3 Go'el; 3.5.1.4 Hesed; 3.5.2 Frames and boundaries in ancient Israelite society: holiness and pollution in their social and religious contexts; 3.5.2.1 Time; 3.5.2.2 Space; 3.5.2.3 Creation; 3.5.2.4 Symbolic numbers; 3.5.2.5 State; 3.5.2.6 The human body; 3.5.2.7 Dietary laws. 
505 8 |a 3.5.2.8 Animal sacrifice3.5.2.9 Summary; 3.5.3 Sickness and healing in the New Testament; 3.6 Conclusion; 4. Advances in Linguistic Theory and their Relevance to Translation; 4.1 Universalism versus relativity; 4.1.1 Metaphor; 4.1.2 Spatial orientation; 4.2 Typology; 4.2.1 Constituent order typology; 4.2.2 Grammatical typology; 4.2.3 Typological semantics; 4.3 Cross-cultural semantics; 4.4 Pragmatics; 4.4.1 The cooperative principle; 4.4.2 Speech acts; 4.5 Sociolinguistics; 4.6 Discourse analysis; 4.7 Information structure; 4.8 Conclusion; 5. Biblical studies and Bible translation. 
500 |a 5.1 Long-standing concerns: new finds and tools. 
520 |a This book offers a broad-based, contemporary perspective on Bible translation in terms of academic areas foundational to the endeavor: translation studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, biblical studies and literary and rhetorical studies. The discussion of each area is geared towards non-specialists, to introduce them to notions, trends and tools that can contribute to their understanding of translation. The Bible translator is encouraged to appreciate various approaches to translation in view of the wide variety of communicative, organizational and sociocultur. 
630 0 0 |a Bible  |x Translating. 
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758 |i has work:  |a Bible translation (Text)  |1 https://id.oclc.org/worldcat/entity/E39PCGQDQpVgYMgFpBYhvvyqkP  |4 https://id.oclc.org/worldcat/ontology/hasWork 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Wilt, Timothy.  |t Bible Translation : Frames of Reference.  |d Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, ©2014  |z 9781900650564 
856 4 0 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/holycrosscollege-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1666906  |y Click for online access 
903 |a EBC-AC 
994 |a 92  |b HCD